Your search for "people elect government" returned 100 results from 29 Founders.
John Adams:"Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other."source: Quotes in John R. Howe, Jr., The Changing Political Thought of John Adams [Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1966], p.189morality, requirements of a free people, necessity of virtue, functionality of government
Thomas Jefferson:"History, in general, only informs us what bad government is."source: Letter to John Norvell, June 14, 1807.history, government, corruption
Zephaniah Swift:"It may generally be remarked that the more a government resembles a pure democracy the more they abound with disorder and confusion."source: Zephaniah Swift, A System of the Laws of the State of Connecticut (Windham: John Byrne, 1795), Vol. I, p. 19. Democracy, Bad Government, anarchy
Thomas Jefferson:"The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions, that I wish it to be always kept alive. It will often be exercised when wrong, but better so than not to be exercised at all. I like a little rebellion now and then. It is like a storm in the atmosphere."source: The Thomas Jefferson Papers Series 1. General Correspondence. 1651-1827 Thomas Jefferson to Abigail Smith Adams, February 22, 1787 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/mtj.mtjbib002565resistance, government
George Washington:"Government is not reason, it is not eloquence--it is a force! Like fire it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master."source: Quoted in Jacob M. Braude, Lifetime Speaker's Encyclopedia, 2 vols., 1:326.trust of government
Benjamin Franklin:"A republic, if you can keep it."source: In answer to a question by Mrs. Powel: "Well, doctor, what have we got, a republic or a monarchy?" Franklin had just emerged from the Constitutional Convention, and his answer was recorded by Joseph McHenry. September 18, 1787.form of government
John Adams:"Remember, democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet that did not commit suicide."source: letter to John Taylor, April 15, 1814. Can be found in "The Works of John Adams", ed. Charles Francis Adams, vol. 6, p. 484Democracy, Bad Government
Fisher Ames:"A democracy is a volcano which conceals the fiery materials of its own destruction. These will produce an eruption and carry desolation in their way."source: Fisher Ames, Works of Fisher Ames (Boston: T. B. Wait & Co., 1809), p. 24, Speech on Biennial Elections, delivered January, 1788.Democracy, Bad Government, anarchy
Gouverneur Morris:"We have seen the tumult of democracy terminate . . . as [it has] everywhere terminated, in despotism. . . . Democracy! savage and wild. Thou who wouldst bring down the virtuous and wise to thy level of folly and guilt."source: An Oration Delivered on Wednesday, June 29, 1814, at the Request of a Number of Citizens of New-York, in Celebration of the Recent Deliverance of Europe from the Yoke of Military Despotism (New York: Van Winkle and Wiley, 1814), pp. 10, 22.Democracy, Bad Government, anarchy
John Quincy Adams:"The experience of all former ages had shown that of all human governments, democracy was the most unstable, fluctuating and short-lived."source: The Jubilee of the Constitution. A Discourse Delivered in the City of New York on Tuesday, April 30th, 1839; (New York: Samuel Colman, 1839), p. 53.Democracy, Bad Government, anarchy
Benjamin Rush:"A simple democracy . . . is one of the greatest of evils."source: The Letters of Benjamin Rush, L. H. Butterfield, editor (Princeton: Princeton University Press for the American Philosophical Society, 1951), Vol. I, p. 523, to John Adams on July 21, 1789.Democracy, Bad Government, anarchy
John Witherspoon:"Pure democracy cannot subsist long nor be carried far into the departments of state, it is very subject to caprice and the madness of popular rage."source: The Works of John Witherspoon (Edinburgh: J. Ogle, 1815), Vol. VII, p. 101, Lecture 12 on Civil Society.Democracy, Bad Government, anarchy
Samuel Adams:"The true patriot therefore, will enquire into the causes of the fears and jealousies of his countrymen; and if he finds they are not groundless, he will be far from endeavoring to allay or stifle them: On the contrary, constrain'd by the Amor Patriae and from public views, he will by all proper means in his power foment and cherish them: He will, as far as he is able, keep the attention of this fellow citizens awake to their grievances; and not suffer them to be at rest, till the causes of their just complaints are removed. --At such a time Philanthrop's Patriot [a King's man] may be "very cautious of charging the want of ability or integrity to those with whom any of the powers of government are entrusted": But the true patriot, will constantly be jealous of those very men: Knowing that power, especially in times of corruption, makes men wanton; that it intoxicates the mind; and unless those with whom it is entrusted, are carefully watched, such is the weakness or the perverseness of human nature, they will be apt to domineer over the people, instead of governing them, according to the known laws of the state, to which alone they have submitted. If he finds, upon the best enquiry, the want of ability or integrity; that is, an ignorance of, or a disposition to depart from, the constitution, which is the measure and rule of government & submission, he will point them out, and loudly proclaim them: He will stir up the people, incessantly to complain of such men, till they are either reform'd, or remov'd from that sacred trust, which it is dangerous for them any longer to hold. "source: Essay in the Boston Gazette, 1771.patriotism, truth, corruption, power, power of free speech, removal from office
Thomas Jefferson:"If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people, under the pretence of taking care of them, they must become happy."source: TITLE: To Thomas Cooper. EDITION: Washington ed. iv, 453. EDITION: Ford ed., viii, 178. PLACE: Washington DATE: 1802 Redistribution of Wealth
Edmund Burke:"The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion."source: Speech at Country Meeting of Buckinghamshire, 1784.liberty, freedom, opression, hope

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